Anaxagorean Sensations are Distinct
Sensation Icon
visual
achromatic
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black down-seed.png
inorganic
yellow evil-seed.png
blue good-seed.png
organic
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red austral-seed.png
thermal
dangerous
hot top-seed.png
freezing bottom-seed.png
safe
cool strange-seed.png
steamy charmed-seed.png
somatic
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left odd-seed.png
taste
sour
tart Acidic-seed.png
soapy Basic-seed.png
salty
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bitter Anionic-seed.png
sweet
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savory Levo-seed.png

Some sensations are ubiquitous, unmistakable and perceptible as opposing pairs. We name them after the ancient Greek philosopher Anaxagoras because he started linking them to European physics. We say that a sensation is Anaxagorean if

$\delta = \pm 1$

for one and only one of

$\delta \in \left\{ \delta_{\it{e}}, \delta_{\it{m}}, \delta_{\it{w}}, \delta_{\tau}, \delta_{\it{T}}, \delta_{\sf{H}}, \delta_{\sf{I}} , \delta_{\sf{S}} , \delta^{*} \right\}$

The numerical values of δ depend on making binary descriptions of sensory experience. So sensations that are complex or ambiguous cannot satisfy this definition, even if they are common and important. For example, the color orange is not unmistakably red or yellow, so it is not Anaxagorean. A sensation must be perfectly distinct to be Anaxagorean. The descriptive method of WikiMechanics is based on mathematical sets of sensations. Arithmetic and algebra are also based on set-theory. And the founder of set-theory Georg CantorXlink.png says that a set is "a collection into a whole, of definite, well-distinguished objects."1 Or in another translation as, "definite and separate objects."2 Moreover, distinguishability is required3 to develop Wolfgang Pauli'sXlink.png exclusion principle which explains many properties of matter from large-scale stability to the periodic table of the chemical elements. Pauli's principle is first expressed in WikiMechanics through this definition of Anaxagorean sensations.
Toyblocks.JPG
Anaxagorean sensations are building-blocks we can use to describe more complicated sensations. They must be distinct so that we can accurately count them, use mathematics to analyze the results, and scientifically describe our perceptions.
Right.png Next step: events.
Summary
Adjective Definition
Distinct Sensations $\sf{\text{ are separate, different and distinguishable}}$ 2-11
Adjective Definition
Anaxagorean $\delta = \pm 1 \ \sf{\text{for one of}} \ \delta_{\it{e}}, \delta_{\it{m}}, \delta_{\it{w}}, \delta_{\tau}, \delta_{\it{T}}, \delta_{\sf{H}}, \delta_{\sf{I}} , \delta_{\sf{S}} \ \sf{\text{or }} \delta^{*}$ 2-12
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