Clocks
//Horlogerie//, Plate 1. Encyclopédie, ou Dictionnaire Raisonné des Sciences, des Arts et des Métiers. Edited by Denis Diderot and Jean le Rond d'Alembert, Paris 1768. Photograph by D Dunlop.
Horlogerie, Plate 1. Encyclopédie, ou Dictionnaire Raisonné des Sciences, des Arts et des Métiers. Edited by Denis Diderot and Jean le Rond d'Alembert, Paris 1768. Photograph by D Dunlop.
WikiMechanics begins with the premise that we can understand time by describing what we see, hear and feel. And according to Albert EinsteinXlink.png time is what a clock tells.1 So to make sense of time we are going to give some consideration to how a clock can be understood as a collection of sensations. Over the next few articles we discuss Temporal Orientation as a binary description of all thermal sensations, and Historical Order as established by comparing temporal orientations. Einstein also taught us that time depends on some frame of reference, so we say a few words about that too. Ultimately clocks are mathematically modeled just like other particles and usually noted using the capital Greek letter $\mathbf{\Theta}$. They are objectified from repetitive chains of events like

$\Psi ^{\mathbf{\Theta} } = \left( \sf{\Omega}_{1} , \sf{\Omega}_{2} , \sf{\Omega} _{3} \ \ldots \ \right)$

And they are all supposedly made of quarks so that clock cycles are represented as

$\sf{\Omega} ^{\mathbf{\Theta} } = \left\{ \sf{q}^{1} , \sf{q}^{2} , \sf{q}^{3} \ \ldots \ \right\}$

Communally, some clocks are prefered for being exceptionally stable, cheap or accessible. Historical examples include seeing the daily movement of a sundial's shadow, or hearing the routine ringing of a bell. Other examples and more details are discussed over the next few articles.

Right.png Next step: frames of reference.
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